"How Did the Computer Learn to See?" Alexander R. Galloway

May 24, 2017

7pm

 

£5 tickets available here.

 

How did the computer learn to see? A common response to the question is that the computer learned to see from cinema and photography, that is, from modernity's most highly evolved technologies of vision. In this talk Alexander Galloway will explore a different response to the question: the computer learned to see not from cinema but from sculpture. With reference to the work of contemporary artists, along with techniques for digital image compression, we will explore the uniquely computational way of seeing the world.

 

This event is organised by the Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture at the University of Westminster in collaboration with Carroll / Fletcher. It will feature as part of a Critical Digital Humanities project run by the Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies at the University of Westminster and Dartmouth College, USA, funded by the British Academy.

 

Alexander R. Galloway is a writer and computer programmer working on issues in philosophy, technology, and theories of mediation. He is author of several books, most recently a monograph on the work of François Laruelle, and is a professor in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University.

 

For more information, please contact Kaja Marczewska (k.marczewska@westmister.ac.uk)